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Förderankäufe Kulturstiftung 2015 im Kunstfonds

Förderankäufe Kulturstiftung 2015 im Kunstfonds

Förderankäufe Kulturstiftung 2015 im Kunstfonds

Alljährlich führt die Kulturstiftung des Freistaates Sachsen Förderankäufe zur Unterstützung sächsischer Künstler/innen durch. Der Ankauf erfolgt zugunsten des Kunstfonds, SKD, der dank dieses Engagements eine seit 1992 kontinuierlich wachsende Sammlung zeitgenössischer sächsischer Kunst aufbauen konnte. 2015 wurden insgesamt 38 Werke von 27 Künstler/innen erworben. Es ist Anspruch der Förderankäufe, künstlerische Ausdrucksformen in ihrer ganzen Vielfalt zu berücksichtigen. Diesem Grundsatz folgten die Erwerbungen 2015 erstmals auch auf dem Gebiet der Performance: Neben Malerei, Grafik, Plastik, filmischen Arbeiten und Fotografie gelangten mit den Werken von Angelika Waniek und Ya-Wen Fu auch vier performative Arbeiten zum Ankauf. Inhaltlich beschäftigen sich die Werke einerseits mit formal-ästhetischen Fragestellungen, andererseits ist ein ausgeprägtes Interesse der Künstler für politisch-gesellschaftliche Themen wie Migration, Rassismus und (Sub-) Kulturen bemerkenswert.

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The photographic holdings of the SES

The photographic holdings of the SES

The photographic holdings of the SES

The Staatliche Ethnographische Sammlungen Sachsen (SES) with its museums in Leipzig, Dresden and Herrnhut has large holdings of photographs from nearly all regions of the world. A selection is currently being digitalised and investigated as part of the research programme “Europa/Welt” (Europe/World) funded by the Museum and Research Foundation. Produced between 1860 and the present day, the photographs were taken by travellers and explorers, colonial officers and military personnel, seafarers and missionaries, anthropologists and ethnologists; many of them have a colonial context. The images – which include prints, negatives and slides – not only reflect the photographic exploration of the world and its diverse cultures but also illustrate the conditions under which they were produced and used. By making these holdings accessible in digital form, it is intended that the visual knowledge stored in them should also be made accessible to people in their communities of origin. The selection shown here provides an initial insight into the diversity of themes covered.

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Global rather than local

Global rather than local

Global rather than local

The masterpieces in Dresden’s Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister could only be produced because artists, patrons and dealers were in contact with one another across territorial borders. For example, painters visited foreign countries and recorded their newly acquired impressions in their pictures; exotic fruits, animals and objects were a source of fascination for artists and patrons in equal measure; Venice was a trading centre for pigments from the Middle East. Works of art themselves also travelled across borders: the Electors of Saxony purchased many important paintings for their collections from abroad. And the works held in the Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister continue to attract art-lovers from every country on the globe – the world of the Old Masters has always been international. Under the motto “Global statt lokal” (Global rather than local), which has been chosen by the Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister for its contribution to the 2015 Night of the Museums, we invite you to view the paintings online as well as in the Gallery from a new perspective.

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Restituted works of art in the SKD

Restituted works of art in the SKD

Restituted works of art in the SKD

As a result of the looting of art during the Nazi period, some works of art ended up in the museums of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden that had been extorted or confiscated from Jewish owners between 1933 and 1945. Works also came into the museums after 1945 in ways which, from today’s perspective, are not morally and/or legally acceptable, e.g. in the course of what is known as the “Schlossbergung” (the seizure and clearance of castles and manor houses) or through the expropriation of people who had fled the GDR. Over the past few years, the origins of many such objects have been identified by employees of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden in the course of the “Daphne Project”. This created the basis for the restitution of works to their rightful owners or their descendants. In some cases it has been possible to repurchase the works of art for the museums or to keep them as generous donations from the owners. This tour presents a selection of such restituted objects that have returned to the collections as purchases or donations.

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Theodor Bienert’s Collection

Theodor Bienert’s Collection

Theodor Bienert’s Collection

Theodor Bienert’s collection of drawings, copper engravings, etchings, lithographs, photos, prints and maps at the Kupferstich-Kabinett of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden guides us from the Bienert mill in Dresden-Plauen through the Weißeritz valleys onto the Erzgebirge Mountains, through the residential city of Dresden, the mountain town Freiberg and the castle town Meißen, along the villages, churches, forts and castles near the river Elbe to the natural beauties of Saxon and Bohemian Switzerland to the Bohemian spa towns. Works created by well- and lesser known artists were assembled by the mill heir Theodor Bienert from Dresden-Plauen in the first two decades of the 20th century. His collection comprises of more than 12.000 sheets in more than 100 folders. Being rich sources for local historians, curators of monuments, art historians and art lover, the topographic views document the development of Saxon and Bohemian cities, villages, sights and landscapes from the end of the 17th to the beginning of the 20th century.

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Supporting Parts in the Green Vault

Supporting Parts in the Green Vault

Supporting Parts in the Green Vault

The Green Vault possesses a variety of drinking vessels, drinking games, nautilus cups, precious boxes, and showpieces, which are carried by creatively designed figures. These “supporting roles” are often played by mythological figures or legendary creatures, such as tritons, nereids, satyrs, basilisks, but also by cherubs, Africans, peasants, and animals. According to 18th century royal taste, you can find gold smith settings with these sea creatures on nautilus, shell, or snail vessels, which impressively show the connection to the element water from which these exotic animals originate. If you look at the design of the supporting figures, Hercules who carries the terrestrial globe and Christopher who carries the celestial globe count among the major artworks in the collection. Here, the gold smiths were able to invent a drinking game with mythological and religious content.

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Views of Dresden

Views of Dresden

Views of Dresden

The view of Dresden and, most of all, its silhouette which is crowned by the dome of the Frauenkirche and the tower of the Hofkirche has fascinated artists throughout the centuries. Next to the uniqueness of the buildings, it is the combination of architecture and landscape as well as the presence of the river in the centre, which had and still has challenged artists. Views of Dresden were created in various media and techniques, not only in paintings, graphics, or pictures, but also on coins, medals, or porcelain. If you hear “views of Dresden”, you obviously think of the famous vedutas by Bernardo Bellotto, called Canaletto, from the middle of the 18th century, which count among the most important works of the Old Masters Picture Gallery. Other museums of the SKD also possess their own views of Dresden.

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Maarten van Heemskerck <br /> The survival of the antiquity

Maarten van Heemskerck
The survival of the antiquity

Maarten van Heemskerck
The survival of the antiquity

Maarten van Heemskerck (1498-1574) worked as a painter in Haarlem. His famous drawings after antique sculpture and architecture were produced in Rome between 1532 and 1536/37. There he also became acquainted with the works of Italian artists who aligned themselves with this tradition. His Roman studies remained an inexhaustible source of inspiration for his work throughout the rest of his life. Of the 600 drawings by Heemskerck that were translated into engravings, the Kupferstich-Kabinett holds 478 prints, which can be viewed in the Online Collection. The tour puts a selection of them into dialogue with other objects from museums of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden. These are mostly sculptures which illustrate Heemskerck’s interest in antiquity and document the close relationship between his works and Renaissance sculpture. The representations of architecture also reveal points of connection with treasury art, such as was collected in European Kunstkammers.

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Relationships. Art expresses emotion

Relationships. Art expresses emotion

Relationships. Art expresses emotion

In the winter holidays in February 2012, children who attend the after-school activity centre at primary school no. 75 in Dresden visited the Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister and the Galerie Neue Meister. This was part of a museum education project in which the children were assigned the task of slipping into the role of art historians and curators and planning a special exhibition on the topic of “Relationships”. In selecting the works, a key role was played by questions such as, “What feelings can exist between people?” and “How can I represent relationships in a picture and how can I recognize them as a viewer?” It soon became clear that, for the children, the most important subject for a painting was “the family”. The “Sistine Madonna” by Raphael was a generic example of a family image. The harmonious relationship between the mother and child was particularly fascinating for the pupils. The result of this three-day project is this tour, which the children developed independently.

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European Portraits

European Portraits

European Portraits

The portrait of men, may it be official or personal, belongs to the finest tasks of art. In ancient times, coins carried the characteristic traits of rulers and herewith claimed power. In Renaissance, portrait blossomed in Europe as it is proven by the delicate silver pen drawing of a clergyman by van Eyck just as by the adorable fresh portrait of a young man by Pinturicchio, who embedded the individual into the landscape. The works of Holbein allow the comparison of direct study and indirect painting. Louis Silvestre shows the Baroque glory, in which the individual recedes behind representational gestures. Graff shines lifelong in self-portraits. Vogelstein surprises with the environment as a lifeworld – and was just taken as an example by Elisabeth Brockmann. Photography alters between staged individual and journalistic group shot: Despite new media, the human figure remains one of the highest themes in art.

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Images of New Objectivity

Images of New Objectivity

Images of New Objectivity

The Galerie Neue Meister (New Master’s Gallery) possesses portraits from the 1920s and 1930s that are very worth seeing. In the art of the Weimar Republic, which became known under the slogan “Neue Sachlichkeit” (New Objectivity) and attempted to undertake a prosaic approach to the realities of everyday life, the portrait played an important role. In the Dresden paintings of these years, portraits of girls and women prevail. The very popular set of motifs covers the working-class woman, who observes socially critical, just as it covers the “new”, self-confident and independent woman and the search for a timeless and natural appearance of femininity away from the glamorous beauty ideal of the Roaring Twenties. In the images of girlfriends, of academy models and of society ladies, which follow in their themes and styles the paintings of old masters, the precise unprettified reproduction of individual characteristics, that includes traces of life and age, has priority.

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Sculpture in the new Albertinum

Sculpture in the new Albertinum

Sculpture in the new Albertinum

The sculpture collection in the Albertinum presents art from the early 19th century to the present. In the bright Mosaiksaal (mosaic hall) and in the sensual Klingersaal (Klinger hall), the white classical sculpture is confronted with the colorful art of the Fin de Siècle. The visitor is able to pass through two completely different eras and gains insights into the artistic development of that time without any explanation necessary. On the ground floor, the tour is continued in a light renaissance hall. Starting with the work by Auguste Rodin, who heralded the age of modern sculpture, the visitor is led from the modern era via post-1945 works from the GDR to contemporary art. Another focus of the collection is revealed in the experimental display storerooms, which exhibit ancient and baroque masterworks. In a few rooms, sometimes unobtrusively, other times exposed, artworks by contemporary artists enter into an exciting dialogue with art of the past centuries.

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